pmo Archives

  1. I am the CADT; and advice on NEEDINFOing old bugs en masse

    Bugsquad barnstar, under MPL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MW_Bug_Squad_Barnstar.svg

    [Attention conservation notice: probably not of interest to lawyers; this is about my previous life in software development.] Someone recently mentioned JWZ’s old post on the CADT (Cascade of Attention Deficit Teecnagers) development model, and that finally has pushed me to say: I am the CADT. I did the bug closure that triggered Jamie’s rant,…

  2. Summarizing “hacker legal education” crisply and cleanly

    James Grimmelman is a better writer than I am. I already knew this, but in this commentary on Biella Coleman’s (excellent) Coding Freedom, he captures something I have struggled to express for years in two crisp, clean sentences: Hacker legal education, with its roots in programming, is strong on formal precision and textual exegesis. But…

  3. Thoughts on the CC Summit

    Oliver's Tattoo (cropped), by Oliver Keyes, used under CC BY-SA

    I was lucky enough to attend the Creative Commons Global Summit in Buenos Aires last week, including the pre-conference session on copyright reform. Like Wikimania, there is simply too much here to summarize in coherent chunks, so here are my motes and thoughts during my return flight: Maira Sutton of EFF summed up my strongest…

  4. San Francisco News

    When I wrote about cutting back on national news, and trying to get more serious about local news in SF, a few people asked that I share my sources of SF news. Here’s a first cut, in alphabetical order: Bay Nature – Bay-area nature-related news and events Burrito Justice – hard to summarize, but city…

  5. At the Wikimedia Foundation (for, um, three months now)

    Wikimania 2012 Group Photograph, by Helpameout, under CC-BY-SA 3.0, available from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wikimania_2012_Group_Photograph-0001.jpg

    Since it was founded 12 years ago this week, Wikipedia has become an indispensable part of the world’s information infrastructure. It’s a kind of public utility: You turn on the faucet and water comes out; you do an Internet search and Wikipedia answers your question. People don’t think much about who creates it, but you…