law Archives

  1. Copyleft, attribution, and data: other considerations

    Public licenses for databases don’t work well. Before going into solutions to that problem, though, I wanted to talk briefly about some things that are important to consider when thinking about solutions: real-world examples of the problems; a common, but bad, solution; and a discussion of the motivations behind public licenses.

  2. Copyleft and data: databases as poor subject

    tl;dr: Open licensing works when you strike a healthy balance between obligations and reuse. Data, and how it is used, is different from software in ways that change that balance, making reasonable compromises in software (like attribution) suddenly become insanely difficult barriers.

  3. Copyleft and data: database law as (poor) platform

    tl;dr: Databases are a very poor fit for any licensing scheme, like copyleft, that (1) is intended to encourage use by the entire world but also (2) wants to place requirements on that use. This is because of broken legal systems and the way data is used. Projects considering copyleft, or even mere attribution, for…

  4. The All Writs Act on Wikipedia v. legal academic reach

    Legal friends! The world needs you. Here’s the graph of readership of All Writs Act on Wikipedia: That’s 45,035 reads yesterday (by humans, not bots).((Big thanks to the tech team for figuring out how to differentiate – not something we could do until fairly recently, at least for public stats!)) That would put it 5th…

  5. Free-riding and copyleft in cultural commons like Flickr

    Flickr recently started selling prints of Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike photos without sharing any of the revenue with the original photographers. When people were surprised, Flickr said “if you don’t want commercial use, switch the photo to CC non-commercial”. This seems to have mostly caused two reactions: “This is horrible! Creative Commons is horrible!” “Commercial…

  6. My Wikimania 2014 talks

    Primarily what I did during Wikimania was chew on pens. However, I also gave some talks. The first one was on Creative Commons 4.0, with Kat Walsh. While targeted at Wikimedians, this may be of interest to others who want to learn about CC 4.0 as well. Second one was on Open Source Hygiene, with…

  7. Slide embedding from Commons

    A friend of a friend asked this morning: Hmmm trying to upload a CC0 public domain presentation from #OKFest14 by @punkish and @SlideShare don’t have public domain license option :( — Jenny Molloy (@jenny_molloy) July 22, 2014 I suggested Wikimedia Commons, but it turns out she wanted something like Slideshare’s embedding. So here’s a test…